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Women S Poetry And Poetics In Late Imperial China


Womens Poetry And Poetics In Late Imperial China
Author: Haihong Yang
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498537871
Size: 58.15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 822
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This study examines women poets and their poetry in late imperial China. The author explores the poetic forms and devices women poets employed, places their work into the context of the wider literary history of the period, and analyzes how they asserted their own agency to negotiate their literary, social, and political concerns.




Herself An Author


Womens Poetry And Poetics In Late Imperial China
Author: Grace S. Fong
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824831861
Size: 49.26 MB
Format: PDF
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Grace Fong has written a wonderful history of female writers’ participation in the elite conventions of Chinese poetics. Fong’s recovery of many of these poets, her able exegesis and elegant, analytical grasp of what the poets were doing is a great read, and her bilingual presentation of their poetry gives the book additional power. This is a persuasive and elegant study. —Tani Barlow, author of The Question of Women in Chinese Feminism "In this quietly authoritative book, Grace Fong has brought a group of women poets back to life. Previously ignored by scholars because of their marginal status or the inaccessibility of their works, these remarkable writers now speak to us about the sensualities, pains, satisfactions, and sadness of being a woman in a patriarchal society. Professor Fong—a superb translator of Chinese poetry, prose, and criticism—has rendered the works of these women in a way that is true both to our theoretical concerns and theirs." —Dorothy Ko, author of Cinderella’s Sisters: A Revisionist History of Footbinding "Professor Fong approaches the poetry of Ming-Qing upper-class women as a social-cultural activity that allowed these women to manifest their agency and assert their own subjectivity against the background of virtual and actual networks of fellow female poets. As the distillation of more than ten years of research by one of the leading scholars in this field, this work is a timely contribution that eminently deserves our attention. Given the inclusion of translations of some of the texts discussed, the book provides a comprehensive introduction to the reading of women’s poetry of the Ming-Qing period." —Wilt Idema, Harvard University Herself an Author addresses the critical question of how to approach the study of women’s writing. It explores various methods of engaging in a meaningful way with a rich corpus of poetry and prose written by women of the late Ming and Qing periods, much of it rediscovered by the author in rare book collections in China and the United States. The volume treats different genres of writing and includes translations of texts that are made available for the first time in English. Among the works considered are the life-long poetic record of Gan Lirou, the lyrical travel journal kept by Wang Fengxian, and the erotic poetry of the concubine Shen Cai. Taking the view that gentry women’s varied textual production was a form of cultural practice, Grace Fong examines women’s autobiographical poetry collections, travel writings, and critical discourse on the subject of women’s poetry, offering fresh insights on women’s intervention into the dominant male literary tradition. The wealth of texts translated and discussed here include fascinating documents written by concubines—women who occupied a subordinate position in the family and social system. Fong adopts the notion of agency as a theoretical focus to investigate forms of subjectivity and enactments of subject positions in the intersection between textual practice and social inscription. Her reading of the life and work of women writers reveals surprising instances and modes of self-empowerment within the gender constraints of Confucian orthodoxy. Fong argues that literate women in late imperial China used writing and reading to create literary and social communities, transcend temporal-spatial and social limitations, and represent themselves as the authors of their own life histories.




Women S Poetry Of Late Imperial China


Womens Poetry And Poetics In Late Imperial China
Author: Xiaorong Li
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295804432
Size: 59.61 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 1361
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This study of poetry by women in late imperial China examines the metamorphosis of the trope of the "inner chambers" (gui), to which women were confined in traditional Chinese households, and which in literature were both a real and an imaginary place. Originally popularized in sixth-century "palace style" poetry, the inner chambers were used by male writers as a setting in which to celebrate female beauty, to lament the loneliness of abandoned women, and by extension, to serve as a political allegory for the exile of loyal and upright male ministers spurned by the imperial court. Female writers of lyric poetry (ci) soon adopted the theme, beginning its transition from male fantasy to multidimensional representation of women and their place in society, and eventually its manifestation in other poetic genres as well. Emerging from the role of sexual objects within poetry, late imperial women were agents of literary change in their expansion and complication of the boudoir theme. While some take ownership and de-eroticizing its imagery for their own purposes, adding voices of children and older women, and filling the inner chambers with purposeful activity such as conversation, teaching, religious ritual, music, sewing, childcare, and chess-playing, some simply want to escape from their confinement and protest gender restrictions imposed on women. Women's Poetry of Late Imperial China traces this evolution across centuries, providing and analyzing examples of poetic themes, motifs, and imagery associated with the inner chambers, and demonstrating the complication and nuancing of the gui theme by increasingly aware and sophisticated women writers.




Women In Qing China


Womens Poetry And Poetics In Late Imperial China
Author: Bret Hinsch
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1538166410
Size: 43.31 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3283
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This groundbreaking work provides an original and deeply knowledgeable overview of Chinese women and gender relations during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). Bret Hinsch explores in detail the central aspects of female life in this era, including family and marriage, motherhood, political power, work, inheritance, education, religious roles, and ethics. He considers not only women's experiences but also their emotional lives and the ideals they pursued. Drawing on a wide range of Western, Japanese, and Chinese primary and secondary sources--including standard histories, poetry, prose literature, and epitaphs--Hinsch makes an important period of Chinese women's history accessible to Western readers.




Poetry As Power


Womens Poetry And Poetics In Late Imperial China
Author: Liuxi Meng
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739112571
Size: 68.85 MB
Format: PDF
View: 4369
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In this thought-provoking analysis, Liuxi Meng profiles eighteenth-century poet Qu Bingyun and her development as an artist. By giving special attention to her dynamic interaction with contemporaries, Meng provides an extensive and detailed picture of the female writer's life and art in the golden age of Chinese women's literature.



Women's Poetry and Poetics in Late Imperial China
Language: en
Pages: 192
Authors: Haihong Yang
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-05-24 - Publisher: Lexington Books
This study examines women poets and their poetry in late imperial China. The author explores the poetic forms and devices women poets employed, places their work into the context of the wider literary history of the period, and analyzes how they asserted their own agency to negotiate their literary, social,
Herself an Author
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Grace S. Fong
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-05-08 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
Grace Fong has written a wonderful history of female writers’ participation in the elite conventions of Chinese poetics. Fong’s recovery of many of these poets, her able exegesis and elegant, analytical grasp of what the poets were doing is a great read, and her bilingual presentation of their poetry gives
Women’s Poetry of Late Imperial China
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Xiaorong Li
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-05-03 - Publisher: University of Washington Press
This study of poetry by women in late imperial China examines the metamorphosis of the trope of the "inner chambers" (gui), to which women were confined in traditional Chinese households, and which in literature were both a real and an imaginary place. Originally popularized in sixth-century "palace style" poetry, the
Women in Qing China
Language: en
Pages: 216
Authors: Bret Hinsch
Categories: China
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022 - Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
This groundbreaking work provides an original and deeply knowledgeable overview of Chinese women and gender relations during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). Bret Hinsch explores in detail the central aspects of female life in this era, including family and marriage, motherhood, political power, work, inheritance, education, religious roles, and ethics. He
Arranged Companions
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Weijing Lu
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-08-19 - Publisher: University of Washington Press
Although commonly associated with patriarchal oppression, arranged marriages have adapted over the centuries to changing cultural norms and the lived experiences of men and women. In Arranged Companions, historian Weijing Lu chronicles how marital behaviors during the early and High Qing (mid-seventeenth through mid-nineteenth centuries) were informed by rich and