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Michigan Ghost Towns Of The Lower Peninsula


Michigan Ghost Towns Of The Lower Peninsula
Author: Roy L. Dodge
Publisher: Thunder Bay Press
ISBN: 9780932212641
Size: 57.78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5752
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Book Description: Michigan: the way it was. Michigan Ghost Towns compiles settlements and communities that have faded into Michigan's history and legend: Bamfield and Bryant were stations or stops on the AuSable & North Western Railway, a narrow gauge track extending from AuSable to Commins, in Oscoda County. In 1908 Charlie Cote, a Frenchman, was the only inhabitant of Bryant. Orral A. Wardlow, now living at Glennie (1970), said Charlie could feed and sleep half-a-dozen people and his place was ""modestly"" famous for his pea soup. Wardlow said Harry Garrett and Ray Rose were supervisors on the railroad. ""The train, which made one round trip daily, was made up of 20 to 25 bunk cars for hauling logs, and whatever boxcars were needed to haul freight, which was not much. The daily arrival of this train at Glennie was something to look forward to, and greeted by the whole town."" ""Billie Ellis, the conductor, would go into Joe Solomon's general store and help himself to a smoked herring that was always handy on top of the counter, "" Wardlow said. ""I don't remember that he ever paid for one, and Joe never complained. It seemed to be a matter of course that Billie had his herring."" Averill: The former village of Averill, famous during the early logging days of Michigan and the Saginaw Valley, lays in a built up business section bordering old US-10 highway between Sanford and Midland. Present day signs advertising a lumber yard, cocktail lounge, and other business places named ""Red Keg"" are the only reminders of the notorious saloon with a whiskey keg mounted on a pole and painted red that inspired lumberjacks to call the place ""Red Keg."" Located on the Tittabawassee River, and later the terminus of the Flint and Pere Marquette Railroad, Averill was the gateway to the vast expanses of white pine timber in the world's most famous lumbering center, the Saginaw Valley. Red Keg was made famous in legends and songs of the lumberjacks. The Valley's most notorious fight between Silver Jack Driscoll and Big Joe Fournier occurred in this saloon, first operated by Billy McCrary, who was no slouch as a riverman and rough and tumble fighter. Later the Red Keg was run by Edward Francis, who moved to Michigan from Canada. After the big fire that destroyed most of the village in 1875-76 Francis moved to Sandford where he opened another hotel.




Michigan Genealogy


Michigan Ghost Towns Of The Lower Peninsula
Author: Carol McGinnis
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 9780806317557
Size: 33.17 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
View: 739
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Michigan Genealogy identifies records on the state and regional level and then the county level, providing details of vital records, court and land records, military records, newspapers, and census records, as well as the holdings of the various societies and institutions whose resources and facilities support the special needs of the genealogist. This thoroughly revised and expanded edition lists, county by county, the names addresses, websites, e-mail addresses, and hours of business of libraries, archives, genealogical and historical societies, courthouses, and other record repositories; describes their manuscripts and record collections; highlights their special holdings; and provides details regarding queries, searches, and restrictions on the use of their records.




Mystery In The Keweenaw Peninsula


Michigan Ghost Towns Of The Lower Peninsula
Author: D.J. Martin
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 1984525107
Size: 25.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 1649
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You met Jane Bowman in D.J. Martin's first book 'Mystery in the Porkies'. In this sequel the young history teacher and amateur archeologist has not just accepted her intuitive skills, but she has sought out the advice of a family friend and learned more about her inherited gift. When she decides to volunteer for a huge archeology dig in and around the ghost towns of Michigan's upper peninsula her intuitive talents unfold. She joins a hundred other young archeology volunteers on an adventure that will truly test her skills. But archeology isn't the only thing going on in the copper country ghost town she's been assigned to. Learning who she can trust becomes paramount as a determined Indian ghost tries to tell her an old secret. She's intrigued, but she also knows that she can't go on this journey alone! The question! Who can she trust?




Railroad Depots Of Michigan


Michigan Ghost Towns Of The Lower Peninsula
Author: David J. Mrozek
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738551920
Size: 19.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 2226
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Michigan has a rich railroad history, which began in November 1836, when the Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad initiated service between Toledo, Ohio, and Adrian, Michigan. That first Erie and Kalamazoo train consisted of stagecoach-like vehicles linked together and pulled by horses. Steam locomotive-hauled trains were still eight months in the future. As these new transportation entities grew and prospered, they put in place more elaborate station buildings in the communities they served. By the end of the 19th century, some of the larger railroad stations being built in Michigan were works of art in their own right. But whatever size and form they took, railroad stations were uniquely styled buildings, and there was generally no mistaking them for anything else. This volume portrays some of Michigan's finest railroad stations during their heyday in the second decade of the 20th century.



Michigan Ghost Towns of the Lower Peninsula
Language: en
Pages: 301
Authors: Roy L. Dodge
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990-05 - Publisher: Thunder Bay Press
Book Description: Michigan: the way it was. Michigan Ghost Towns compiles settlements and communities that have faded into Michigan's history and legend: Bamfield and Bryant were stations or stops on the AuSable & North Western Railway, a narrow gauge track extending from AuSable to Commins, in Oscoda County. In 1908
Railroad Depots of Michigan
Language: en
Pages: 127
Authors: David J. Mrozek
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008 - Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
Michigan has a rich railroad history, which began in November 1836, when the Erie and Kalamazoo Railroad initiated service between Toledo, Ohio, and Adrian, Michigan. That first Erie and Kalamazoo train consisted of stagecoach-like vehicles linked together and pulled by horses. Steam locomotive-hauled trains were still eight months in the
Michigan Ghost Towns
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Roy L. Dodge
Categories: Extinct cities
Type: BOOK - Published: 1970 - Publisher:
Books about Michigan Ghost Towns
Michigan Genealogy
Language: en
Pages: 496
Authors: Carol McGinnis
Categories: Reference
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005 - Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
Michigan Genealogy identifies records on the state and regional level and then the county level, providing details of vital records, court and land records, military records, newspapers, and census records, as well as the holdings of the various societies and institutions whose resources and facilities support the special needs of
Great Lakes and Midwest Catalog
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Partners Book Distributing
Categories: Booksellers' catalogs
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007 - Publisher:
Books about Great Lakes and Midwest Catalog